Do this today and reap the rewards in the future!

Credit: Andrew Kirby
Picture by Andrew Kirby

I love a click-bait title. I am really a sucker for them.

And I’m sure I’ve seen a majority of the ‘how to become a millionaire’ videos on Youtube, in English and in French!

This week I came across two videos which are very similar, from two life/business coaches. Andrew Kirby and Sam Ovens have got many very interesting videos on their channel about productivity, smart thinking and self-improvement. Very much worth a look if you are interested in such topics.

Here are the two videos I watched:

What you’re doing today might not seem to pay off now…

I often fall in the trap of ‘it’s not changing anything, why bother!’

Saving or investing small amounts of money, enrolling for a webinar, reading 10 minutes, meditating 5 minutes, doing a couple of push-ups … These things seem so insignificant. They don’t seem to have any payoffs.

It’s so easy to forget about these little actions we take everyday, be it our lunches, our daily thinking etc.

What this graphs shows… is what everybody keeps telling us. A very abstract concept: it all compounds to create your future.

… but do the hard work now and your future self will thank you!

The 0.1% of a million I have finally managed to invest (yay me!) might look so insignificant compared to my goal. But you have to start somewhere. I can build onto it. And build some more.

And one day, I’ll approach 1%, 2 %, maybe even 10% of my goal. That will already be a huge achievement!

I hate working hard.

I suffer from procrastination big time.

I find thinking about the future frustrating and abstract.

I am impatient.

The truth is that is the only way to fulfill my goals and reach my potential, one day at a time.

To conclude:

I can research as much as I want, watch as many motivational videos as I want, elaborate complicated plans and prevision: nothing will get done if I don’t DO THE WORK!

Keeping your cool when stocks go down

This morning I logged into my stocks and shares ISA and found out that my £500 deposit was now only worth £498! Where have those £2 gone? Was investing ever a good idea in the first place?

In the short term seeing numbers fluctuate up and down can be scary and daunting; especially given how much hard work is required to save and invest that money in the first place.

It is easy to forget in the midst of this that only a week ago, my investment was worth £506. So how can I avoid that sinking feeling in my stomach when it all seems to go wrong?

Only invest what you could realistically afford to lose.

There is an important reason why most financial gurus out there cite investing as the last step of a financial make over, after saving up 6 months emergency fund.

This money could probably give you a lot of returns. However, it may be years, or even decades before the investment pays off – depending on the market.

Having an emergency fund in an easy access savings account enables you not to depend on selling to get your investment back. And thanks to dear Murphy and his law, it would probably happen when the markets weren’t doing so great.

For peace of mind, only invest what you can afford to lose (even if nobody really wants to ever lose it of course!)

Remember you’re playing the long game

You’ve done your research and in good faith invested in what you thought were decent index funds, ETFs or mutual funds. All the graphs showed a steady increase for the last 5 years (apart from the blip in March). And now your investment portfolio is steadily losing value.

Don’t give up just yet. Have a look at the last 5 years and see how many high and lows the graph shows on a day to day basis and how the average still goes up over the course of the years. One of the huge differences between a fixed interest ISA and an online stocks and shares ISA (like Vanguard for example) is that the daily variations of the market are reflected in the day to day value of the latter.

Don’t get obsessed with the numbers. Just let it do it’s magic in the long term.

Don’t forget, it’s all about learning

I admit that seeing the numbers going down can be unsettling at first and that long term investors seem to have nerves of steel. The good news is: you are becoming one of them!

At the end of the day, people can research for years how to make the best investment, makeup strategies as to how to (hypothetically) time the market and what the best brokerage is… the only way to learn about investing is, unfortunately, to invest!

It is by going out there, out the comfort zone of the ‘what-ifs’ and ‘maybes’ that the most powerful lessons are learned. This initial learning and experience then serve as a solid base for further learning and understanding of the wonderful world of investments, whether you read finance magazines, go through FIRE forums posts or watch Youtube videos on the topic.

Enjoy the learning curve!

To conclude:

First save. Then invest.

Going back to basics – expense tracking

Image by Bruno /Germany from Pixabay

Every financial blog post, podcast, Youtube and article that I have read over the last two years have contained this one piece of advice: ‘track your expenses’. This was usually followed by: ‘create a budget’.

I have during different periods of my life definite phases:

  • the ‘I have no money so what’s the point’ phase
  • the ‘Not having a budget works for now, why bother’ phase
  • the ‘I need to track my spending obsessively with loads of charts phase’
  • the ‘I missed a week, I give up!’ phase

You may recognise yourself in one or more of those. I know that I have cycled through these quite often at different times. However, there was a golden period of 4 months were I did have it down to a tee. That’s what I aspire to go back to.

So what should I have done differently at the time?

Find a really motivating long term vision.

Image by <a href="https://pixabay.com/users/ToNic-Pics-3001971/?utm_source=link-attribution&utm_medium=referral&utm_campaign=image&utm_content=1573529">Tom und Nicki Löschner</a> from <a href="https://pixabay.com/?utm_source=link-attribution&utm_medium=referral&utm_campaign=image&utm_content=1573529">Pixabay</a>
A long term vision.

In that golden era, I recorded all my spending and savings and knew exactly where every single £1 went. I saved enough for my yearly car insurance with a sinking fund; I even saved for Christmas presents. However, there was one problem that affected the sustainability of my system: I didn’t have a long-term goal.

At the time I hadn’t even heard of the FIRE movement. I didn’t have any concrete financial aspirations. I had never even considered investing in the market or real estate as an option. So when I saved money, though it did feel good, I didn’t have a clear purpose for it other than spending it later.

Since getting more interested in personal finance, I have discovered the caveat of not saving/investing for retirement. I have learned how inflation very slowly gnaws through savings. As a result, I have found out I cannot afford not to invest in my future.

Know your milestones

As you saw in my last post, there are some resources out there that can give some realistic and broken down milestones for financial goals; whether it is saving 3 months of expenses for an emergency fund, investing enough to cover basic living expenses, or just striving to be debt-free.

Creating a long term plan with realistic and achievable goals is the one vital thing I didn’t do during that 4-month golden phase. As a result, the £10 I saved on my phone bill, the £5 I didn’t spend on drugstore make-up and the £3 I saved by packing my lunch that day just got absorbed by my everyday spending.

What I do in those moments now is take out a calculator to work out how much closer to my goal I would be if I didn’t spend that amount. Even if it’s 0.00012%, I know that it is making a difference. Charting progress on a graph can also help to see this change visually.

Learn the art of delayed gratification

This is by far the most difficult one for me at the moment. I want to see progress and I want to see it now!!!

I know how frustrating it is to see number creep up super slowly. Times where I have set backs and times where I overspend. And times where I think to myself ‘is it really worth it?’

I want to throw in the towel, give up the hard work of going through my accounts everyday, writing everything down, planning every expense and be disciplined in my spending. I just want to live in the moment, ‘Carpe Diem’ and buy that thing I really want.

However, I need to remind myself that though the process takes time, it will be completely worth it one day. I know this because of the inspiring testimonials of people who have done this before me.

To conclude: This is something I am starting to work on from now. I hope to be able to share this journey to inspire and motivate people on their own journey.