Dave Ramsey’s take on how to become a millionaire

The other day on Youtube, I typed ‘Invest £100 a month’. I was trying to find examples or testimonials of people who invested this much a month because, as I have said before, becoming a millionaire £100 at a time would take more than a lifetime.

Well, Youtube didn’t disappoint; I wasn’t prepared for this though! XD

Obviously, if I am breaching copyright I am happy to take this down. However, this video is too good not to share!!! No copyright infringement is intended and all credit of this video goes to Dave Ramsey.

Investing £100 a month, my own – uneducated – calculations

Dave Ramsey here is assuming 12% interest.

I do not pretend to know much about the stock market just now, so I prefer to project using 7% interest. The results I get are very decent and manage to hit my own minimal Financial Independence for retirement. But as the title of the blog suggests, I would be a lot happier with a million pounds.

Investing 15% of income, my calculations

I have just had a small raise of £54 from this month and was wondering how to calculate this amount. I had two options.

Option 1: the first was to just calculate 15% of the new salary.

Option 2: the second was to calculate 15% of the old salary, then add £54 on top of that. That would mean that any raise would get added directly into the investment without tempting me in lifestyle inflation.

In the end, I decided that option 2 would be more in keeping with advice from the FIRE community. Therefore, I entered that particular amount in the calculator, again with 7% interest and 2% inflation.

Again, as you can see, with 7% interest I would probably still not hit a million in 40 years. However, I would end up with a very tidy sum of £742,797,94.

My take away point from crunching the numbers

After playing around with the calculator with some time, I came up with these final, realistic(ish) number.

To retire at the age of 65 with one million pounds, I would have to invest £475 a month (7%, 2% inflation) until then. I better start saving/investing then!

This month I managed to invest £236.74, nearly 50% of that target amount.

So I have some way to go to reach this goal. However, I have hit a milestone this month: I have finally saved up the equivalent of 6 months of salary in my emergency fund!

To conclude: I would love to be more optimistic about the market and have the knowledge that I would need to be able to make similar statements to Dave Ramsey.

One point he did put across powerfully is consistency and discipline are key in this process and that sacrifices can be made to get there.

Now my last question is: after a raise, does my emergency fund need to be topped up to 6 times the new salary?

Going back to basics – expense tracking

Image by Bruno /Germany from Pixabay

Every financial blog post, podcast, Youtube and article that I have read over the last two years have contained this one piece of advice: ‘track your expenses’. This was usually followed by: ‘create a budget’.

I have during different periods of my life definite phases:

  • the ‘I have no money so what’s the point’ phase
  • the ‘Not having a budget works for now, why bother’ phase
  • the ‘I need to track my spending obsessively with loads of charts phase’
  • the ‘I missed a week, I give up!’ phase

You may recognise yourself in one or more of those. I know that I have cycled through these quite often at different times. However, there was a golden period of 4 months were I did have it down to a tee. That’s what I aspire to go back to.

So what should I have done differently at the time?

Find a really motivating long term vision.

Image by <a href="https://pixabay.com/users/ToNic-Pics-3001971/?utm_source=link-attribution&utm_medium=referral&utm_campaign=image&utm_content=1573529">Tom und Nicki Löschner</a> from <a href="https://pixabay.com/?utm_source=link-attribution&utm_medium=referral&utm_campaign=image&utm_content=1573529">Pixabay</a>
A long term vision.

In that golden era, I recorded all my spending and savings and knew exactly where every single £1 went. I saved enough for my yearly car insurance with a sinking fund; I even saved for Christmas presents. However, there was one problem that affected the sustainability of my system: I didn’t have a long-term goal.

At the time I hadn’t even heard of the FIRE movement. I didn’t have any concrete financial aspirations. I had never even considered investing in the market or real estate as an option. So when I saved money, though it did feel good, I didn’t have a clear purpose for it other than spending it later.

Since getting more interested in personal finance, I have discovered the caveat of not saving/investing for retirement. I have learned how inflation very slowly gnaws through savings. As a result, I have found out I cannot afford not to invest in my future.

Know your milestones

As you saw in my last post, there are some resources out there that can give some realistic and broken down milestones for financial goals; whether it is saving 3 months of expenses for an emergency fund, investing enough to cover basic living expenses, or just striving to be debt-free.

Creating a long term plan with realistic and achievable goals is the one vital thing I didn’t do during that 4-month golden phase. As a result, the £10 I saved on my phone bill, the £5 I didn’t spend on drugstore make-up and the £3 I saved by packing my lunch that day just got absorbed by my everyday spending.

What I do in those moments now is take out a calculator to work out how much closer to my goal I would be if I didn’t spend that amount. Even if it’s 0.00012%, I know that it is making a difference. Charting progress on a graph can also help to see this change visually.

Learn the art of delayed gratification

This is by far the most difficult one for me at the moment. I want to see progress and I want to see it now!!!

I know how frustrating it is to see number creep up super slowly. Times where I have set backs and times where I overspend. And times where I think to myself ‘is it really worth it?’

I want to throw in the towel, give up the hard work of going through my accounts everyday, writing everything down, planning every expense and be disciplined in my spending. I just want to live in the moment, ‘Carpe Diem’ and buy that thing I really want.

However, I need to remind myself that though the process takes time, it will be completely worth it one day. I know this because of the inspiring testimonials of people who have done this before me.

To conclude: This is something I am starting to work on from now. I hope to be able to share this journey to inspire and motivate people on their own journey.